Category Archives: Workshops

WW4 – Workshop Week In the Studio online

Excited to again be part of Workshop Week 4. This series formed in Fall of 2020, answers creatives’ thirst for learning, exploring techniques and thinking. Jumping online we all learned quickly as instructors and students. Look over the descriptions and contact each instructor directly with questions and to register.

Plans are already in motion for October 2022 and February 2023 sessions. Follow on facebook and IG @IntheStudioOnline

 IN THE STUDIO WORKSHOP WEEK 4

Welcome to In the Studio Workshop Week 4 (WW4). We are excited to offer 9 workshops this time around. A couple have proven popular in the past, and the rest are brand new. None will run concurrently so that you may register for as many as you wish.

All classes will be held online via Zoom. The Zoom link will be sent to you by your instructor via email prior to the class. Please read through the class descriptions carefully, and if you have any questions or would like to register, email the instructor of the class directly.

Note that by registering for any WW4 classes, your email address may be shared with all instructors for the purpose of organization and follow-up. You will not be added to any mailing lists.

All workshops will be taught in English.

One paid registration = one participant.

All teachers are standardizing to a NO REFUND POLICY. If you find that you cannot attend a class, you may transfer your registration to a friend. Make sure you contact the teacher before doing so.

BONUS EVENTS
All registered students are eligible for two bonus Workshop Week events: Workshop Week Panel Discussion Join us for a bonus episode of our online series In the Studio in which the instructors will engage in a panel discussion and take your questions. It will be held Sunday, January 30, 2022, at 6:00 PM Eastern. The Zoom link will be sent the day before the panel discussion to all students registered for at least one class. The topic of the panel discussion will be announced closer to the date. Workshop Week Gathering You are cordially invited to join the WW4 instructors and students for an online gathering Sunday, February 6, 2022, at 6:00 PM Eastern for 1.5 hours. This gathering is a place to chat, to show off pieces begun during WW, to work on a piece in progress, or to just sit back and listen to the conversation. The Zoom link will be sent the day before the hook-in to all students registered for at least one class.

WORKHOP OPTIONS

BUILD A BABY BOUCHEROUITE With Laura Salamy

Sunday, January 30 at 1:00 p.m. Eastern

Course description Boucherouites are having their day! They’re so trendy that you can’t look at a Better Home and Gardens magazine or watch an HGTV show without seeing them.

The Berber tribe of Morocco have been creating Boucherouites, one-of-a-kind, hand-knotted rugs since the mid-20th century. Traditionally, they’re made using old clothes and other textile scraps. They’re a pretty freestyle form of expression often looking as if the weaver started with one color scheme and pattern, got bored, and moved onto something else. They’re fun in a colorful, spontaneous way and are easily adaptable to rug hooking.

In this workshop you’ll design your own hooked “Baby Boucherouite” rug and start to hook it with textile scraps you have on hand be they cotton clothing, old bedsheets, and/or leftover wool noodles. The sky’s the limit! We’ll also discuss how to prepare, cut, and hook with non-wool materials.

Length of class: 2-3 hours

Who should take this course This class is designed for a student proficient at rug hooking basics, particularly the mechanics of pulling loops through a backing.

Materials needed Because this is an online workshop, students will supply their own materials. Materials will include those one usually uses to hook a rug as well as a few others. More information will be provided to students upon registration.

For more information/to register, contact Laura@highonhooking.com

Class fee: $50 US

About Laura Salamy Laura Salamy is the hooker behind High on Hooking.

I’ve never been a “traditional” hooker, preferring to color outside of hooking’s more “typical lines.” Instead of limiting myself to wool, I prefer to use most any material I can get my hands on. Often that means cutting strips from old t-shirts and bed sheets. Up-cycling throw-aways to art is a priority for me. Our landfills are filling up. Or they’re already full. While certain projects benefit from virgin wools or other fibers, I like to do my little part to slow that process and make something lovely at the same time.

Laura’s work has been seen in various exhibits as well as Rug Hooking Magazine; ATHA’s Art of Rug Hooking magazine; Karen D. Miller’s book Eyes Open to the World: Memories of Travel in Wool; and Judy Taylor’s T-Shirt Treasures: Creating Heirloom Hooked Rugs from the Humble T-Shirt. She currently serves as President of the Adobe Wool Art’s Guild, New Mexico’s only rug hooking guild. Learn more about her work at https://highonhooking.com.

FINISHING IS AN ELEMENT OF YOUR DESIGN –
CHOOSE THE RIGHT ONE
With Susan Feller

Monday, January 31 at 6:00 p.m. Eastern

Course description How many projects are done but not finished? Learn how to select the technique that enhances your work. Many of us always use one method “to get it done.” The edge or frame should not detract from the artwork, rather integrate its style into the environment.

Students will be asked to send an image(s) of completed work in advance. Instructor will provide suggestions of finishing techniques. Once in agreement, a tools and supply list will be sent. Work will begin in class. The full class will learn a variety of finishing techniques including: crochet; fringe; whip, multi-cord whip; and canvas wrapped for hanging. Handouts along with live demos will be provided.

Who should take this course If you consider finishing to be a chore, haven’t learned any method or use just one, if you want to enter work in an exhibit, gallery, or sale, this class will help. Pick up a few tips and maybe share your own approaches to completing your artwork.

Materials needed Susan will send list after communicating with student.

For more information and to register contact rugs2wv@gmail.com

Class fee is $50 US

Recommended reading: Finishing Hooked Rugs: Favorite Techniques from the Experts (published by Rug Hooking Magazine). The chapter “Framing Art” was authored by Susan.

About Susan Feller Susan has been a custom picture framer for two decades. As a professional artist she brings experiences about being rejected and accepted into juried shows. Willingly sharing lessons culled from these experiences is the purpose of this class. To see more of Susan’s work, visit https://artwools.com.

BRAIDING AS A WAY TO FINISH A HOOKED OR PUNCHED PIECE
With Yvonne Iten-Scott

Tuesday, February 1 at 1:00 p.m. Eastern

Course description Braiding is a lovely way to finish the edge of your hooking or punching. In this class you will learn how to create the perfect braiding and attach it to your work. The braid will be joined together with a hidden seam. We will then beautifully finish off the back with a padded back and wool or other fabric.

Length of class: 3 hours Number of students: 6-16

Students who have already hooked or punched a small circular piece. Basic knowledge of hand sewing will be helpful.

Materials needed Participants should come to class with a hooked or punched circular work with an unfinished back and 1- to 2-inch border of backing. Also needed: needle, thread, a piece of wool or other fabric for the back of the circle, quilt batting, scissors, and wool for the braid. Optional: braid masters for folding the braid and a rug clamp which can be purchased from the instructor.

Class fee is $50 US


For more information or to register, please contact Yvonne at itenscott@aim.com

About Yvonne Iten-Scott Yvonne credits her Swiss father with instilling the value of handcrafted items. Her love of homesteading and traditional craft has led her to recently return to a rural lifestyle with chickens, guineas, bees, and a large studio to create and teach.

A voracious traveller and lifelong learner, Yvonne has studied with some of the world’s best fibre art teachers. She brings these many influences together in her artwork – notably with a freedom to explore. That means no rules and all fibers and techniques are fair game. It’s about delving into oneself and aspiring to create more sculptural pieces in her practices.

Find more information about Yvonne’s work at https://yvonneitenscott.com

CREATING PERSONAL LANDSCAPES
WITH ALTERNATIVE MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES
With Elizabeth Miller

Tuesday, February 1 at 6:00 p.m.

Course description Join Elizabeth Miller for an exploration of landscape (or seascape, snowscape, etc.) in both its literal and metaphorical meanings. Students will be asked to provide a landscape image, real or imagined, that has meaning to them and reinterpret it through rug hooking. Key questions will include, “What does this scene mean to you?” ”What do you find most interesting/engaging/compelling about this landscape visually, symbolically, texturally, historically?” “What materials and techniques will best recreate and express the impact this view has on you, as the artist?”

This workshop is for students who want to take their art beyond basic representation of a scene and create a hooked/fiber art image that speaks very personally to them. It is also for students who want to broaden the range of materials and techniques they use regularly in their hooking. The resulting piece may or may not be directly representational of the scene that inspired it, depending on the student’s individual preference and aesthetic. However, each resulting piece will reflect the student’s personal relationship with that landscape.

Materials needed No prior use or knowledge of alternative materials or techniques is necessary. Beth will demonstrate thirteen techniques beyond the basic loop and provide suggestions for materials besides cut wool or yarn. A list of suggested materials and tools to have on hand will be provided prior to class as well as a PDF document describing each technique covered. Assistance in finding sources for any of the suggested materials will be provided.

Class fee is $50 US


For more information or to register, please contact Elizabeth at parrishousewoolworks@gmail.com.

About Elizabeth Miller: Elizabeth Miller is the founder and teacher at Parris House Wool Works in Paris, Maine, a studio promoting traditional skills and all things rug hooking. She is the author of Heritage Skills for Contemporary Life: Seasons at the Parris House, published by Down East Books in 2021. Her work has appeared in Making Magazine and Rug Hooking Magazine and will be featured in an upcoming episode of the television show, Maine Cabin Masters.

More information can be found at https://parrishousewoolworks.com

SHOWING UP FOR YOURSELF – IN ART & LIFE
With Meryl Cook

Wednesday, February 2 at 1:00 p.m. Eastern

Course description: How can you use your art as a means to really show up for yourself – to heal, to be more fully the person you are meant to be, to thrive, to express what’s inside?

What does it mean to show up for yourself? Using journaling and sketching the class will explore: how to get unblocked; exercises for showing up for yourself; and design methods such as tapping into the body feeling to create abstract designs. Depending on your particular art practice, you will create a design or a series of designs based on what you need right now – to be well, to thrive, to be happy.

Who should take this course Artists and creatives who are ready to dig a little deeper, to practice self compassion and who want to take their art to a new level. All are welcome.

Materials needed A list will be sent upon registration and contact with Meryl.


For more information or to register, please contact meryl@merylcook.ca.

Class fee is $50 US

Recommended reading One Loop at a Time, a story of rug hooking, healing and creativity and One Loop at a Time, The Creativity Workbook both by Meryl Cook. (More info below.)

What people are saying:The writing exercises were insightful. A ‘growing’ experience. I appreciate the work and energy you put into making it both fun & informative … your skilled teaching. Your teaching style is engaging and encouraging and sensitive. You strive to include all the participants with a gentle, encouraging manner. You have a nice calm & soothing way of presenting. I love, love, loved your class and your work and the stories behind your work. Meryl facilitated the workshop in a calm and nonjudgmental way, giving each participant a chance to reflect and express their response to the colours.”

About Meryl Cook Colour, texture, joy and self-compassion define Meryl Cook’s work as an emerging fibre artist, writer and facilitator in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. Her current mediums are rug hooking, spinning, wet felting and journaling. Meryl’s mission is to inspire others to reconnect with their joy and creativity.

At age 58, Meryl turned to journaling and rug hooking as a way of showing up for herself following treatment for breast cancer. Since 2016, Meryl has spoken and taught creativity workshops (in person and virtual) across Canada and in the U.S. She is a juried member of Craft Nova Scotia and was the Craft LAIR resident in 2018. Her work has appeared in The Ice House Gallery and Argyle Fine Art Gallery in 2021, in the Mary E. Black Gallery in 2019 and 2020, and as a special exhibit at Sauder Village Rug Hooking Week in 2018. Her collaborative piece Boundaries/No Boundaries with Linda Rae Coughlin is currently part of the Global Textile Hub exhibit ‘Reimagined’.

Meryl is the author of two books, One Loop at a Time, a story of rug hooking, healing and creativity (2016) and One Loop at a Time, The Creativity Workbook (2017). Her chapter “Journaling and the Reinvention of the Self One Loop at a Time” appears in the recently published (June, 2021) Transformational Journaling for Coaches, Therapists and Clients by Lynda Monk and Eric Maisel. www.merylcook.ca

EXPRESSION THROUGH ABSTRACT RUG HOOKING
With Haley Perry

Wednesday, February 2 at 6:00 p.m. Eastern

Course description Rug hooking is a process that encourages abstraction through the nature of the fabric medium. In this course, we will explore how to use abstraction to create more expressive artwork. We will discuss the formal elements of design in art and participate in drawing exercises to put these theories into action. This class will be a first step in developing your personal visual language, allowing you to build the abstract and narrative rugs of your future.

Who should take this course Students with interest in any textile art are encouraged to register, as the lessons taught apply to a wide variety of mediums.

Materials needed This design class will be a lecture format with drawing exercises, so a sketchbook, pencil, and colored pencils are needed to participate.

Class fee is $50 US


For more information or to register, contact Hayley at loopbyloopstudio@gmail.com.

About Hayley Perry Hayley Perry has been making and designing rugs for years thanks to her family members, who taught her everything she knows about rug hooking from a young age. After earning her graduate degree in painting in 2011, Hayley developed Loop by Loop Studio, a rug hooking design business, taking after her mother and aunt.

More recently, rug making has become a true artistic expression once Hayley started to delve into her own personal narrative. She has shown her rug hooking and painting work in galleries all over the United States. Hayley has been granted multiple artist residencies to share her rug hooking practice and has written articles for Rug Hooking Magazine and Wool Works magazine. Hayley has a passion for teaching art and rug hooking and has taught many different art courses throughout New England.

Learn more about Hayley’s work at https://www.loopbyloopstudio.com.

PET PORTRAITS With Charlie Dalton

Thursday, February 3 at 6:00 p.m. Eastern

This workshop will be divided into two sessions: FIRST Going over Charlie’s portrait process from photo choice to transferring the photo to a backing to starting to hook (approximately 3 hours) AND A follow-up session for trouble-shooting and sharing your work with the class (1-2 hours) will be scheduled during the first session.

Who should take this course Participants should be proficient at rug hooking basics. Please register early enough to talk with Charlie about what makes for a good pet image, your hooking experience, and suggested materials.

Materials needed A high quality photo (or three) of your pet;

A computer with an app to edit and print your image (e.g., Photoshop or Photoshop Express which is free);

  • A wool cutter with a #4 blade OR good fabric scissors for cutting;
  • 2 rug hooking hooks (smaller shank hook for hooking and a larger shank hook for tracing);
  • A sheet of carbon paper (source this early!);
  • Packing tape;
  • Printer;
  • 18” x 16” piece of linen (12” x 10” working space);
  • Sharpie marker;
  • Scissors; and
  • A good selection of wool in the colors that you will need for your particular pet (these wools can be new and/or recycled).

For more information or to register, please contact Charlie Dalton at charlievdalton@gmail.com.

Class fee is $50 US

About Charlie Dalton

Charlie Dalton, aka The Hooking Colonel, is a former Spanish teacher who now lives in Price, Utah. He learned to hook from his mother-in-law, Cass Gannaway, while teaching in Sewanee, Tennessee. He enjoys geometrics and enjoys incorporating his drawings inspired by Alma Thomas into the rugs that he hooks, but his passion is animal portraits. Charlie started creating animal rugs to give to friends mourning the passing of pets, and over time his work developed into the cosmic pups that he hooks today. Charlie credits a close circle of friends with some pretty special pups for being the impetus for his pet portraits. You can learn more about Charlie and see his work on Instagram @thehookingcolonel.

BASICS OF WATERCOLOR FOR THE TEXTILE ARTIST
With Jane Mason

Friday, February 4 at 1:00 p.m. Eastern

Course description Having a few basic watercolor skills and a journal can help you capture the color and energy of a scene. This is helpful as you use your journal entries, photos, and notes to weave your thoughts and visions into your own textile art.

A goal of this course is to inspire you to grab a journal, wander around in nature, and do watercolor sketches of an element that leads to textile art.

No watercolor or drawing experience is required.

This is a Zoom class. The techniques and processes we discuss are intended to be used for sketching anywhere inside or out. The tools are minimal and can fit in a gallon-size zipper-type bag.

I’ve sketched with watercolor at parks, in airports, and at cafés. It’s an adaptable and portable skillset. And sometimes less intrusive than taking photos of a scene.

What’s included
1. Introduction to watercolor tools: paper, paint, brushes, watercolor pencils, and watercolor crayons.
2. Introduction to basic watercolor and micron pen sketching techniques.
3. How to evaluate a scene and decide what to include.
4. How to create meaningful notes to help you interpret your sketch back in your studio. 5. A checklist of “The Ten Commandments of Watercolor.”

Length of class: 2-3 hours (Teacher will stay longer for questions, etc.)
Number of students: 6 min., 14 max.

Who should take this course Anyone with an interest in adding to their artistic skill set as a textile artist. It’s perfect for rug hooking, punch needle, quilters, collage artists, and more. Even if you are an experienced watercolorist, I believe this course will add some tips to your current knowledge. All ages: from 9-90.

Materials

  • If you want the least expensive paint set, I recommend a standard Crayola pan of watercolor paints. The brush is terrible in this set. Make sure you get a “real” brush, see below.
  • Or, as an intermediate level, the Cotman Brand by Winsor Newton, the Field Kit “Pocket Box” is a good choice.
  • A more professional (and expensive) set is the Daniel Smith Paint Set, “Essentials Introductory Watercolor,” 6 Tubes. Included: Three cool primary colors: Hansa Yellow Light, Quinacridone Rose, and Phthalo Blue, and three warm primary colors: New Gamboge, Pyrrol Scarlet, and French Ultramarine. If you get the Daniel Smith set, you will also need a small tube of Burnt Siena watercolor paint, and a palette to put everything on. A palette can be a plastic plate, a plastic palette, or a ceramic plate. 2.Basic graphite pencil (#2 is fine), eraser, and optional pencil sharpener.
    3.A watercolor sketch-book journal. At least 5” x7”. Look for one with 140# cold-pressed cotton paper. I prefer wire-bound because they are easy to open flat.
    4.Watercolor pencils. You can buy them individually at your local independent art store. Or a small set, 8-ish, is usually a good collection. Any brand is fine. Note: these are not colored pencils. They are watercolor pencils.
    5.Optional: watercolor crayons. These we use in a similar way as watercolor pencils, so they are not required. But they offer another tool for a variation of techniques.
    6.One of two round watercolor brushes size 6 and 8. Or 6 and 10. Princeton is a recommended brand. Expect to pay anywhere from about $8 to $25 for each brush. Don’t get a crummy brush.
    7.A Micron Ink pen. I prefer a .05 size tip and larger. I find that the smaller tips skip on watercolor paper. 8.Other supplies, such as a cup of water in a container that is exclusively used for art, and facial issues or paper towels. A mister spray bottle is helpful.
  • I recommend registering at least two weeks before the class to allow time for supplies to arrive. Depending on the brand and quantity of supplies purchased, the cost may be between about $50-$90 US. Supplies will not be purchased from me but from retail vendors, hopefully local, independent art stores.
    Students may take the class without purchasing supplies and opt to buy them later if interested. You will still get much out of the class from watching the demonstrations and participating in the discussion, but I recommend acquiring the minimum supplies to work with us in class.

For more information or to register, please contact Jane Mason at janemmason123@gmail.com.

Class fee is $50 US

What people are saying “I’ve got to admit that I was intimidated going into the class. I don’t consider myself a creative person. I am handy and can learn any technique, but I wouldn’t think of myself as an inventive artist. Jane taught me that we are all artists in our own rights. Having her show techniques and different options awakened my creative imagination.” Member, Cream City Rug Hooking Guild

“Jane expertly guided a group of 17 students in a thorough review of the basics, allowing each participant to share their knowledge while skillfully staying on schedule to fully cover the course objectives…. Jane, helped students translate their ideas into a textile design and working textile piece.” Member, Loopy Ladies Rug Hooking Guild

About Jane Mason As a professional watercolorist and textile artist, Jane has been teaching for 30 years. She studied Textiles and Design at the University of Nebraska and completed her master’s degree in Museum Studies at Harvard University.

Her work, including paintings, hooked rugs, quilts, and collage pieces, have been exhibited in dozens of solo and group exhibits across the US and in Italy.

Jane won her first art contest at a museum in Omaha as a five-year old. Ever since that honor, she has considered herself an artist working to maintain her five-year old point of view in her typically colorful and sometimes whimsical work.

She has been a consultant on two occasions to the curators at the Harvard Art Museums on interpreting and analyzing watercolor paintings in their collection. Jane has published many articles in art-related publications including one on how to select a frame for rug hooking in ATHA Magazine.

In addition to teaching, painting, and hooking, Jane enjoys traveling to visit her grandchildren, always arriving with lots of art supplies and textile projects.

Learn more about Jane’s work at https://fromjanemmason.com.

EXPRESSIVE ART THERAPY THROUGH RUG HOOKING
With Deirdre Pinnock

Saturday, February 5 at 1:00 p.m. Eastern

Course description This expressive art therapy class will inspire women to express themselves through rug hooking. Expressive art allows participants to show their individual personalities and bring attention to their strengths – their own “normal” – in an environment where there is no judgement, only encouragement. To create and experiment while revealing your inner self, bring your worms and yarns and especially all the materials you were told you shouldn’t hook with.

Who should take this course Any rug hooker who strives to or may find it difficult to embrace their own sense of self and then express that is encouraged to attend. All skill levels welcome.

Materials needed The items you usually hook with to include: scissors, hooks, backing, frame/hoop, and so on. A variety of materials for hooking. Examples include: fabrics, yarns, twine, nylons, wire, pipe cleaners, your own hair, paper, rubber bands, coffee filters, and so on. There is no limit to what you can play with and hook!

For more information or to register, please contact Deirdre at dap1babs@yahoo.ca.

Class fee is $50 US

About Deirdre Pinnock: Deirdre Pinnock is a talented rug hooker, mental health advocate, aspiring entrepreneur, and self- identified “woman of color” based in Vancouver, British Columbia. She is passionate about fusing different materials, vivid colors, and therapeutic qualities into her work with a dash of playfulness.

Deirdre received a grant with well know rug hooker Nadine Flagel to teach youth and seniors in Richmond, BC. She accepted another grant to teach during the East Van Crawl with the “Hooked in the Maples” group in Vancouver. She also teaches at the Britannia Library and other neighborhood locations.

The purpose behind Deirdre’s art revolves around self-healing and empowerment to battle through her grief, pain, and anxieties. She likes to weave the current political climate into her fiber art and confront issues in a whimsical and humorous way.

See more of Deirdre’s work at https://christina7479.wixsite.com/deirdrepinnock.

Workshop Opportunity week of Oct 26-30

UPDATE: the first week went very well, full classes in all five sessions wonderful feedback from surveys. Plans are being finalized for a second week of virtual workshops, a couple of featured vendors and again bonus events. Registration will open early December for the Jan 31- February 5, 2021 Workshop Week.

There are five instructors who have come together under In the Studio to offer a workshop each day/night the week of October 26-30.

All registered students will also be invited to participate in two bonus Workshop Week events:

Workshop Week Hook-In

Join all of the instructors and the other students for an online hook-in. It will be held on Wednesday, October 28th, 2020, at 6:30 pm EASTERN for 1.5 hours. The Zoom link will be sent the day before the hook-in to all students registered in at least one class.

Workshop Week Panel Discussion

Join us for a bonus episode of the series ‘In the Studio’ where the five instructors will engage in a panel discussion and will take your questions. It will be held on Friday, October 30th, 2020, at 6:30-7:30 pm EASTERN. The Zoom link will be sent the day before the panel discussion to all students registered in at least one class.

Here are the classes and intro featuring each instructor. Note in the descriptions the way to contact the teacher for registration links and payment. We all look forward to this exciting time getting “together” in 2020 and learning. Please note that by registering for any classes in Workshop Week your email address will be shared with each of the five instructors only for the purpose of organization and follow-up and to invite you to the above sessions. You will not be added to any mailing lists.

WORKSHOP OPTIONS

TRAVEL DESIGN: LET THE WORLD INSPIRE YOU
lead by Karen D. Miller

Monday, October 26th, 2020,
at 6:30 pm EASTERN – 9:00 pm EASTERN

Find inspiration for your art from your own travels! Using your memories, your photos or even just your dreams of where you would like to go once the pandemic is over, we will talk about how to find, capture and interpret your ideas. Travel does not have to be far from home so, even if you haven’t travelled to exotic locales, this class is still for you. The hands-on activities in this class will leave you feeling inspired and with a number of designs ready to turn into art, no matter what medium you use!

This class is inspired by Karen’s book Eyes Open to the World: Memories of Travel in Wool published in 2019 by Ampry Publishing. It is not necessary to purchase the book to take this class, but students may find it a useful supplement to the information in the workshop.

Materials Needed:

  A sketchbook (or a book with blank pages)

  Pencil, eraser and pencil sharpener

  Pencil crayons

  Photos from somewhere you have travelled (can be close to home or further afield, and can be printed out or on a device)

  A small watercolour set and brush(es) (does not need to be fancy- can be a set for kids) Class Fee: $45 US (Conversion will be made to CAD for Canadian students).

Payment can be made by e- transfer for Canadian students, or a PayPal invoice will be sent to students outside of Canada. For more information or to register please email Karen D. Miller at info@karendmillerstudio.com.
Karen D. Miller is a fibre artist living and working in Ottawa, Ontario. She has had her work exhibited across Canada and the United States, and in Canadian and American publications as well as those in Europe and Australia. Her work has been featured four times in Rug Hooking Magazine’s annual Celebration of Hand-Hooked Rugs, and in 2020 she was invited to be one of four judges for the publication. In addition, she is a frequent contributor to Rug Hooking Magazine. This past November, her first book, Eyes Open to the World: Memories of Travel in Wool, was published by Ampry Publishing. You can learn more about Karen and see her work at www.karendmillerstudio.com.

BASICS OF DESIGN: EXPLORE THE VOCABULARY FOR DESIGNING- ELEMENTS AND PRINCIPLES

with Susan L Feller

Tuesday, October 27, 2020, at 6:30 pm EASTERN – 9:00 pm EASTERN
Beginner or years into your fiber arts journey, this workshop will help to incorporate the building blocks (elements and principles of design) to create better compositions. Students will explore the concepts using small samples, and will become comfortable using design, materials and techniques.

In the 2.5 hour session we will define the Elements and Principles of Design and discuss the universal art vocabulary. Exercises included require pencil, paper, a selection of fabric in range from light to dark, and an open mind. YOU CAN DRAW. Participants will be invited to a private group for follow up discussion and more assignments over a three month period.

This class is based on Susan’s book Design Basics for Rug Hookers, published by Stackpole Books and available in an online search.

You will be contacted by the instructor before class to expand on materials and to allow for a discussion of one’s personal background in designing and expectations for the class.

Optional Materials:

For Canadian students: Wool kits and backing available by contacting Martina Lesar (studio@martinalesar.com); ask for Design Workshop Kit.

For US students: Wool kits and backing available by contacting Parris House Wool Works in Maine (parrishousewoolworks@gmail.com); ask for Design Workshop Kit.

 Please note that purchasing Susan’s book and/or the Design Workshop kit are not required, but both are beneficial to have for the class.

Class Fee: $45 US. An invoice will be sent electronically.
For more information or to register, please email Susan L. Feller at rugs2wv@gmail.com with “Design Class” in subject.

Susan L. Feller is an award winning fibre artist, author, and teacher. She is a frequent contributor to Rug Hooking Magazine and she has had her work featured in and been a judge for their publication Celebration of Hand-Hooked Rugs. Susan frequently exhibits her work across North America. You can learn more about Susan and see her work at www.artwools.com.

HERE AND NOW IN WORDS AND FIBER
with Elizabeth Miller from Parris House Woolworks

Wednesday, October 28, 2020, at 1:00 pm for approximately 2.5 to 3 hours in length.

“Creativity is always a leap of faith. You’re faced with a blank page, blank easel, or an empty stage.” – Julia Cameron

Beth says “In this workshop we explore the intersection of words, writing, visual images, and the emotions and responses they evoke through the medium of rug hooking. However, we are narrowing our context down to the here, the now, the present, the close at hand. In this time of COVID-19, I want to turn that feeling of restriction into an expressive opportunity through the use of visual design and accompanying poetry/prose. We will focus on our immediate environments. The purpose here is to expand your appreciation for the seemingly familiar and see it in new ways.

Through a series of wordplay and sketching exercises, we will come up with a short piece of original writing (think Haiku, single stanza poem, or ten line prose) that will form the foundation of your rug design.

While this workshop is not meant to be a traditional “how-to,” I am also happy to talk about how to apply materials other than wool or techniques beyond the basic loop to your individual design if you are inspired to do so. This differs from my telling or showing you “what to do” as this project is going to be deeply personal ,and you are the intuitive expert on its creation.

I will offer a closed Facebook group for workshop attendees who want to continue interacting as they finish their projects and can provide ongoing support and resources through completion.”

Materials needed:

  • Pencil and sharpener
  • Eraser
  • (Optional) Images you may want to work with/phone or tablet camera
  • Medium to large sketching paper – can be pieced together if needed
  • Notebook for writing
  • Fine tip Sharpie
  • Quilting square is helpful
  • Ruler, if no square
  • Hoop or frame
  • Rug hook

Snip scissors

Variety of colors and textures in wool and/or fiber

18” x 18” (suggested) or some other size serged/zigzagged/taped rug foundation

Cutter or some way to cut wool/fiber

(Optional) Calligraphy or art paper and pens Class Fee: $45 US
For more information or to register, please contact Elizabeth Miller at parrishousewoolworks@gmail.com.
Elizabeth Miller is the owner and artisan at the Parris House Wool Works in Paris, Maine. She has taught workshops at numerous locations, including at the Squam Art Workshops, and the Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village. Her work has been featured in Rug Hooking Magazine and Making Magazine, and she has a line of originally designed, hand-hooked, home decor items available through the Beekman 1802 Mercantile in Sharon Springs, NY. You can learn more about Elizabeth at her website www.parrishousewoolworks.com. Her upcoming book, Heritage Skills for Modern Living: Seasons at the Parris House is available for pre-order through her website as well as on Amazon.

INTUITIVE DESIGN with Meryl Cook
Thursday, October 29, 2020, at 1:00 pm-4:00 pm EASTERN

Join Meryl Cook as she shares her intuitive design process. In this class we will explore creative journaling (writing and sketching) as a means to create designs from within. This workshop will appeal to artists wanting to stretch their design muscles and to those wishing to explore a unique approach to journaling. You will learn: creative journaling methods for unblocking creativity and how to use your journal to create simple, intuitive designs.

These designs can be translated to your rug hooking or to any artistic medium. No need to be a rug hooker, all are welcome. Be prepared to have fun and leave with practical tools for journaling and an intuitive design.
Materials needed: a journal (or paper), pens or pencils and a sense of adventure. Highly recommended is Meryl’s second book, One Loop at a Time, The Creativity Workbook. Class fee: $45 US (approximately $59.14 Canadian as of September 9).

For more information or to register, please contact Meryl Cook at meryl@merylcook.ca. Payable by e- transfer within Canada to meryl@merylcook.ca or by PayPal if outside Canada. Class limit of 12 students.

Meryl Cook, artist, author, speaker and facilitator, specializes in connecting people with their creativity. Her corporate work focuses on engagement and well-being. Recent corporate clients include Nova Scotia Department of Environment Water Branch, Service Nova Scotia & Internal Services and Argyle Fine Art.

She is a sought after teacher in the journal writing and fibre arts communities. As an artist, colour, texture, joy and self-compassion are the key features of Meryl’s beautifully crafted hooked rugs and her books about her journey from homeopath to artist and journal writer. Meryl’s home studio is in Dartmouth, where she hooks and spins looking out at the Halifax Harbour.

Meryl is the author of One Loop at a Time, a story of rug hooking, healing and creativity and One Loop at a Time, the Creativity Workbook- both of which can be purchased from her website, www.merylcook.ca.

BUILD A BABY BOUCHEROUITE with Laura Salamy

Friday, October 30, 2020 at 1:00pm EASTERN for approximately 2.5-3 hours in length.

Boucherouites are having their day! They’re so trendy that you can’t look at a Better Home and Gardens magazine or watch an HGTV show without seeing them.

The Berber tribe of Morocco have been creating Boucherouites, one-of-a-kind, hand-knotted rugs, since the mid-20th century. Traditionally, they’re made using old clothes and other textile scraps. They’re a pretty freestyle form of expression often looking as if the weaver started with one color scheme and pattern, got bored, and moved onto something else. They’re fun in a colorful, spontaneous way and are easily adaptable to rug hooking.

In this workshop you’ll design your own “Baby Boucherouite” rug and start to hook it with textile scraps you have on hand be they cotton clothing, old bedsheets, and/or leftover wool noodles. The sky’s the limit! We’ll also discuss how to prepare, cut, and hook with non-wool materials.

This class is designed for a student proficient at rug hooking basics, particularly the mechanics of pulling loops through a backing. You need not own a cutter to participate (or even to hook rugs!).

Because this is an online workshop, students will supply their own materials.

Materials needed: Hooks; Backing of choice, enough to allow for a rectangular mat at least 12” by 6”;
A frame; A pencil (or “magic” pen) and Sharpie (we’ll draw rugs straight onto the backing); Fibers of choice (wool, yarn, old clothing/textiles, whatever); and

A mind and spirit open to experimenting and FUN. Class Fee: $45 US
For more information or to register please contact Laura Salamy at Laura@highonhooking.com. Class limit of 12 students.

Laura Salamy is the hooker behind High on Hooking. I’ve never been a “traditional” hooker, preferring to color outside of hooking’s more “typical lines.” Instead of limiting myself to wool, I prefer to use most any material I can get my hands on. Often that means cutting strips from old t-shirts and bed sheets. Up-cycling throw-aways to art is a priority for me. Our landfills are filling up. Or they’re already full. While certain projects benefit from virgin wools or other fibers, I like to do my little part to slow that process and make something lovely at the same time.

Laura’s work has been seen in various exhibits as well as Rug Hooking Magazine; ATHA Art of Rug Hooking magazine; Karen D. Miller’s book Eyes Open to the World: Memories of Travel in Wool; and Judy Taylor’s T-Shirt Treasures: Creating Heirloom Hooked Rugs from the Humble T-Shirt. She currently serves as President of the Adobe Wool Art’s Guild, New Mexico’s only rug hooking guild.
Learn more about her work at https://highonhooking.com.

We look forward to this exciting week filled with energy, experiments and experiences to share. Sessions are filling as each instructor has sent the information to their mailing lists.

Old and New Studies

McDonald Sisters work mid 1960’s

What a privilege I have been offered to study and mount one of the McDonald Sister’s rugs.

Linking up, through a referral from the State Museum archivist, with the owner of two pieces has lead to hearing stories of the original purchase in the late 1960’s directly from the sisters, the “home life” of these textiles in their family rooms for years and for the past two decades tucked away in guest bedrooms in their summer cottage always on the floor. Come to find out the family had relatives who knew these ladies and even photos with mutual people. All of this adds more bits to the articles and stories I have gathered in researching how the handwork was done, by whom and why techniques were used now almost fifty years after the makers have passed on.

back stitches

New questions arise by looking at the back of this rug. There is an intricate pattern of stitches outlining the motifs. That makes sense, the layers are all attached, stuffed flowers, leaves and stems embroidered with details BUT the threads on the front are colorful and those showing on the back consistently dark? And why are there tiny light blue x’s in thread detailing many large petaled flowers? Those stitches are not seen on the top at all.

layers and stitching

In one area the backing fabric has worn and we see a layer of burlap, with the same stitches covering it. Did the ladies make this repair? Did the owner? I do not think so since they have recently had some wear on the front professionally repaired by a West Virginia quilter (good work matching fabrics and threads).

The steps I go through to mount this rug so its life can continue on the wall will be documented in the next few posts. In the mean time, to catch up with who Otha and Blanche McDonald were and the textile work they created, I invite you to visit the series of pages under the tab at ArtWools.com/McDonalds  .

Research has been supported by funding through a Tamarack Foundation Fellowship award. Glenville State College research library and the archives at the State Museum in Charleston, WV have supplied me with much of the leads and photographs. Blanche graces the cover of the first issue of Hearth and Fair which has become Goldenseal Magazine.

Emily Hilliard

Recently Emily Hilliard, West Virginia’s Folklorist, visited the studio and I shared my collected knowledge on the McDonalds along with my personal journey with textile crafts. She is the first official folklorist for the state, funded in part through the National Endowment for the Arts and working at the West Virginia Humanities Council.

 

The most recent pieces I have been working on channel the sisters and the revealing techniques they used. Measuring 11 x 14 each, the same design was first hooked to look like the back of a rug.

Three McDonald mimics by Susan L Feller

The second piece is the front. Each upholstery fabric petal is stuffed with polyester filling, stitched to the linen backing and then embellished with a different embroidery stitch to make each flower unique.  I definitely felt the ladies were working alongside and perhaps Otha had some critical comments I brushed off as Blanche may have over the years together.

The third version is a rearranged collage of upholstery fabric, applique’d and embroidered onto a striped sample. The back embroidered with a quote and book title by two environmentalists: Marjory Stoneman Douglas and Rachel Carson. This adds to the series “Pillow Talk” I have been creating over the past year.

My studies throughout have been History and the Arts and this project feeds both of these curiosities. I continue to search for more work by Otha and Blanche McDonald. Perhaps you recognize their style and can lead me to a piece, please send a message.

If you are interested in working on any of these handcrafts, I am teaching Rug Hooking, Applique’ and Embroidery at Augusta Heritage Center July 22-27  and would enjoy meeting you and sharing skills.

Many Hands Dyeing

Terminology on labels include descriptive words which conjure up action. One we use in textiles is “hand-dyed”. Here are the visuals behind that phrase from a session lead by Nancy Parcels with wool fabric. She included several great team building exercises such as dividing us into three groups to sort the light, medium and dark values and then as we eagerly shared in the dye pot bounty.

wools drying from session by Nancy Parcels

Marrying colors in the dye pot create a palette to enhance strong colors as a background and secondary motifs. Sort and dye up a pot for your next project.

2016’s influence

It’s time to look back, review, evaluate and gather inspiration from the people, places and things on my journey of 2016.

With students and friends while gathering for a few days of immersion in our mutual interests…fiber arts on the Puget Sound, retreating in Hampshire County WV and South Carolina, teaching in Maryland and Ohio at Sauder Village and lectures at Schwenkfelder Library, Pennsburg PA inspired me as much as my encouraging their design skills. Working with Alissa Novoselick and Emma Pepper developing an arts conference in WV; participating in an exhibit curated by Roslyn Logsdon in Maryland; promoting the McDonald Sisters of Gilmer County to thousands; and handing off a legacy to Green Mountain Hooked Rugs exposed me to new skills and supportive people.

Big city Seattle, arts filled Asheville, rural Summerville Georgia,  Thomas, WV population 600 and the beauty of nature along trails in Fayetteville, Seneca Rocks, and Harpers Ferry are places remembered in my sketch books and beginning to appear in fibers.

We gather objects to remember places and people especially collecting them from fellow artists. I like to wear jewelry made by artist friends when traveling, it is as much of an ambassador as I am. We often photograph our flowers in the art vases, new artwork hanging on log walls, and even show great food on our trips sharing our experiences with an “extended family”. Thank you to Kate Harward, Ginger Danz, Christine Keller, Norma Acord, Donald Stone, Wendy Clark, Rebecca Wudarski, Mountain Daughter Metalworks, Bruce Wilson and Marilyn Bottjer for your talent we live with daily.

I am planning to explore places, interact with friends and react to artwork daily in 2017, perhaps we will meet up on our journeys and share some experiences.

Travel Sketches-Seattle

Beginning a new series based on my travels. The challenge is to simplify the experience.

I decided a journal approach will help develop style and studies for larger art. Less pressure to “nail it” the first time and as you will see, the exercise leads to my goal… concise yet informative designs. Techniques and materials are not clarified yet, although my new supply of cotton fabric and threads will be tapped into.

Thanks go to the students in my design class at Puget Sound Rug School, who energized my own creativity. The first sketch is a result of one of the exercises. List a topic, describe it in words and motifs.

Initial Sketch

Initial Sketch

Over the past week I have developed three separate designs inspired by the trip to Seattle. The City View has seen 6 versions so far.  Next steps to decide size, techniques, materials and begin with my favorite tools-my hands. Slowly I will communicate.

 

Exploring Seattle

Two days ahead of Puget Sound Rug School I have immersed myself in Seattle visually and physically. Who knew you could “hike” five miles in a city?  Camera in pocket and rain gear on here are some inspiring compositions.

Okan Arts Japanese cottons

Okan Arts Japanese cottons

First stop was a fiber mecca for me. Patricia Belyea has amassed an amazing collection of Japanese yukata cottons available for  US quilting and fiber artists from her shop in Seattle or online at OkanArts.com.  I selected bold patterns and intimate repeats of lines to be combined into my art.

Pikes Market produce

Pikes Market produce

Vendors carrying produce, flowers, artisan products, and baked goods entice the tourists at Pikes Market down along the waterfront. The blast of color and natural shapes caught my attention.

The city is filled with contrasting shapes, lines of different strengths, and shots of color in the structures, everyone vying  for attention.

Coffee Beans

Coffee Beans

And then there was the sensual allure of roasting coffee at THE Starbucks Reserve Roastery and Tasting Room.   Notice the gentle curves of the copper tubes and the warm color of the roasted beans awaiting the personal selection.

All of my senses were heightened. I am sure to end up with some visual artwork from these hours spent in the Emerald City.  Traveling from the West Virginia mountains to a metropolitan area increases the awareness of structure.

Class topics in 2014

I just reviewed photos from workshops this year.  Many lessons were taught, dozens of lessons learned, and plans were made for next year ….  all reasons why I teach.  See the calendar for workshop sites in 2015.

Alta Vista Golf Course, site of workshop

Alta Vista Golf Course, site of workshop

 

I flew to Mesa Arizona in January right in-between the coldest spells in West Virginia.  People came down from South Dakota to escape the cold and others ‘wintered’ in sunny Arizona.  The projects were colorful and three days went too quickly.

 

 

The class at Cedar Lakes Rug School was filled with sixteen eager students.  Some had finally signed up with me after a few years of seeing work by other students and others repeated with new projects and goals.  At the end of the week, I complimented them all, referring to this session as a Masters Class.  I was challenged, they contributed and every project was well on its way to being a great piece.  I am teaching here again next year, email Nancy Blair at  thhkrugs@altelco.net   for details.

The topic at Green Mountain Rug Hooking School in Vermont was the Moods of Color.  We did get to hooking designs based on a mood the participants brought  but began the three days with several exercises.  On the blackboard each posted a word under one of six colors.  Before looking farther what would you say about Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue and Purple?

Manistee Rug School in Onekama, MI is coordinated by a guild rather than a business.  Volunteers for every job join together bringing in the new members and adapting each year to the needs of all.  This was a repeat for me, the first time was in 2011.  I made a point to dine with a different instructor each evening, making new friends and delving deeper into old friendships.  The class included beginners, pattern designers, experimenters, folk painters and abstract artists.  Diverse and challenging, their projects evolved well over the week.

Sauder Village Rug Week is in Archbold, OH is in its 18th year.  Ruckman Mill Farm vended again right next to Dorr Mill Store in the Exhibit Hall where we enjoyed the Celebration rugs and special collection of Esther and Judy Knipe.  The workshop I taught covered a wide variety of ways for Finishing Hooked Rugs, (title of new book by experts in each technique… including a chapter on finishing work for gallery exhibits by me).  We used the exhibit to explore finishes, talked about the appropriate new technique for students work and using a small sample “learned” three techniques.  Response from the students was to offer this again.  Look for class schedules at SauderVillage.org in early November.  I will be teaching several different classes all week.

Susan L. Feller, Ruckman Mill Farm

Susan L. Feller, Ruckman Mill Farm

 

Retreat into the Mountains 2012

Retreat into the Mountains 2012

  24 great energetic and creative souls came together this year for the 5th RETREAT INTO THE MOUNTAINS at Peterkin Camp and Conference Center, Romney,WV.  We are gathered here on the expansive porch in our colorful array of dress. The new officers of Mountain State Fiber Artists make up the first row. 

Great weather for the weekend including the foliage which was gradually coming out after the extreme heat in March, allowed us to keep our minimal schedule including hiking up to the waterfalls and hemlock grove, driving out by caravan to Ruckman Mill Farm for dinner prepared by Jim on Saturday evening and hours of hooking on the porch and in the lounge space into the wee hours of the night. 

2012 group at the waterfalls, Peterkin

             The theme for this year was to react visually to the phrase: “everybodyneedsfiber” Several participants came with designs in a small format (8 inch or so squares).  One was a combination of different sized printer’s blocks creating a composition of the letters.  This will be a study in value and depth using materials and techniques to enhance the subtle tones of the wood blocks. A jar of Metamucil was another interpretation:  Every BODY needs Fiber.   

         Another was Betsy Warner’s energetic lady happily lying in a field of color, prodded butterflies hovering above and her hair wildly flying in the green field.  The variety of fibers and techniques accented the phrase ” EVERYBODY NEEDS FIBER!”

           

The trip to Ruckman Mill Farm included showcasing the beef cattle raised here in Hampshire County:  Angus, Herefords and even Longhorns. Yes Texas Longhorns are raised here for the lean meat, and seem to enjoy a steady diet of green grasses.

  Visit other blogs for their interpretations of the retreat:Lauren Fuqua from Ohio: www.rugsandpugs.blogspot.com  

Donna Bennett another Ohioian: http://www.CrowsontheLedge.com 

Susan Hoekstra, New Jersey our presenter this year on the topic Color Theory www.Foxview.com and www.Needlefest.com

Canada Tour

Feeling abit like the Royal Couple, (Will and Kate), I have been in Canada since June 24th, hosted by Susan Sutherland in the Kitchener/Waterloo area to conduct a fraktur design workshop within the Mennonite region of the design source.  The following hostess was Anne Boissinot who lives near the McMichael Collection in Kleinburg.  We toured this museum complex for a full day, exchanging our artistic views.  What a great way to learn– visit a museum with a friend with similar interests.

I stopped briefly at Rittermere-Hurst-Field to lunch with Jeanne Field, Andrea Shepphard and the family/workers.  Will be back for the Circle of Friends on July 9th in Aurora.  See www.Letshookrugs.com for information.

Now in Belleville for the two weeks, enjoyed Canada Day by touring Prince Edward County.  Art exhibits, farmers markets, and a beautiful day all recorded in my mind or on camera.  Took shots of the sun moving across a mowed field highlighting bands at a time.  The square bales were stacked in pyramids to be picked up later.  Shapes, light and values were on my mind since this is the theme for the Loyalist College class beginning July 11th.  www.Loyalistfocus.com see Susan Feller for details, opening in class still.