Tag Archives: tighr

Educating about Craft

The responsibility of craftspeople is to pass on their skills. Educating is a goal of all rug hooking organizations. During the ATHA Bi-Ennial in Cleveland, OH a panel addressed opportunities for individual members and groups to EDUCATE. Representing the internationals I collected the following stories.

The Australian Rugmakers Guild connects their vast membership using cyberspace, local groups and conferences in different parts of the country. Click on the name of the guild and sign up for their posts. Bec Andersen conducted another community art project. This time with adults for a community center. Three panels were designed and punched then installed.

Yarrabilba Community Centre in 2017. The images of the panels were conceptualised by a group of children using stories of Yarrabilba past and present as inspiration.

Norma Hatchett worked with seniors, the blind and children, her projects are described and photographs in the Oct/Nov/Dec 2013 Newsletter of the Guild on pages 9 and 10 and featured in an article by Josephine Franco in Sept/Oct 2012 Rug Hooking Magazine

Cherished Memories, Childhood Dreams, 10′ x 4′, yarn hooked on hessian with a speed needle.  Designed by Norma Hatchett and created by residents at an Australian hostel for patients with dementia.

Sue Girak is currently coordinating a project to bring awareness of waste products to students. She and her partner are surveying participants through the process, documenting their reactions to materials selected (plastic grocery bags, t-shirts, recycled fabric), methods used to hooked/prod/punch these, personal feelings of waste. A public display of several 6 foot tall fiber footprints will culminate their research. Although this is based in Perth, West Australia our conversation opened an invitation for a US or Canadian group to participate. If seriously interested contact Sue for a survey and parameters (her email is in the attached description)  Walking Together with Pride, Perth, Australia. The Wanneroo Rugmakers have joined in and are using plastic bags and prodding them into two larger than life footprints.

Brightly coloured “toenails” on the right footprint have been hooked using department store coloured plastic bags. The skin is being hooked with plastic bread wrappers. The red/gold prodded flower decorates the strap of the thong sandal

Jo Franco, Editor of Australian Rugmakers Guild wrote about several of these projects in the J/J/A 2016 issue of Rug Hooking Magazine which focused on Education.

In Japan several individuals train generations in the fine techniques of rughooking. Noriko Manago is adept with three-dimensional creatures and children’s designs. She is often seen working with children and their mothers in her Instagram presence at @togemuse

Canadians have the history of working in our crafts with their grandmothers, mothers and siblings and pass this on to the next generation. Val Galvin of British Columbia can be found on Facebook at Renditions in Rags Hooked and Braided Rugs and is profiled on TIGHR.net as one of our Collector’s Cards.

In QuebecKathleen Menzies, is an art teacher. She incorporated a variety of learning elements into a semester long project. The students portraits were translated into values and digitalized for latch-hooking using a program called leftsource.com.  The students evaluated their experience, with one lesson being “do not procrastinate, you might run out of materials along with time.” Here are some more lessons What have we learned by working on this project

Latch Hooked Portraits

The Beaconsfield Rug Hooking Guild is in Montreal area. They coordinated with the Sherwood Elementary School a project to learn rughooking which was inspired by reading the ATHA article Gene Shepherd wrote on educating youth. Every age group reaped rewards from the intergenerational lessons. Check out the album of pictures at Children Rug Hooking .

What I learned from gathering these stories is that a few can inspire many. Working within a school system, creating lesson plans, coordinating funding, and the thrill of communicating with people outside of our comfort network is a more valuable reward than just seeing a completed project. The International Guild of Handhooking Rugmakers invites members for the cyberspace linking and a triennial general meeting in the host country.

Share your craft with people you do not know, someone will pass it on to others a few years down the road.

 

 

 

New Zealand by Air and Foot

A trip of my lifetime began three years ago when the International Guild of Handhooking Rugmakers new board was announced to be based in Australia.  As Past-President of course I was going to attend the tri-ennial conference in the Fall of 2012.  My grandfather taught me to save for a goal and the envelope came out for just that… a trip halfway around the world!  Why not explore another country near the destination?  So New Zealand went on the list.  Internet searching made planning a breeze with Maps, and sites to explore from luxury of homebase.  A few emails and even one phone call to New Zealand confirmed all of the lodging and airplane legs.  And we discussed how to pack for two weeks in a carryon weighing no more than 7kg (15 pounds) and one suitcase.

October 8 dawned and the first leg began.  Drive to Frederick, MD and park my car with a friend while Deb Smith and I continued in her vehicle to Dulles Airport.  Check-in at United for cross-country flight to Los Angeles.  The rest was on Air New Zealand… highly recommended and after our 7 flights with them, I agree. FLY WITH AIR NEW ZEALAND if you can.  In Los Angeles we met up with Linda Rae Coughlin and the threesome continued to Auckland, NZ, through customs and dropped off our luggage for a domestic hop to Rotorua.

Deb and Susan in transit

We arrived in Rotorua, one of the most active thermal regions in the world.  On our list to see were the mud pools, geothermal waters, and steamy volcanic forested areas.  The government of New Zealand wisely realized in the early 1900’s that deforestation without replanting would destroy the economy and ecology.  They mandate every tree which is cut must be replanted and the climate creates quick growth especially in the evergreens.  A REDWOOD forest was planted in that period and the trees have grown to hundreds of feet tall already.  Here the three of us are posing on a tree which fell but then sprouted several “limbs” as new trees. 

Linda Rae, Deb and Susan on Redwood

I decided to drink tea on the trip and found ordering “tea for two” was less expensive than two cups of tea.  Deb and I often shared a pot of English Breakfast. 

Tea at the Rotorua Museum Cafe

One observation is the cost of food either in supermarkets or at restaurants, cafes was higher than in the States until we realized there was NO TIPPING, for any service, taxi, guide, and certainly not waiters.  This does not stiffle service.  Our reaction to New Zealanders in general was friendly, helpful and welcoming; we were encouraged to return to visit the South Island (only one week of travel time), and given added advice before asking.  Tourism must be high on the economic impact list but I felt they all truly enjoyed living in New Zealand and being “Kiwis”.

There is a new envelope with a two dollar coin inside, beginning my return trip to New Zealand.

 

 

TIGHR Skype to Australian Board

Gathered around the screen "talking" to Australia

 
 
The first international communications between TIGHR members was conducted at the Sauder Village Rug Hooking Event.  Coordinated by “web savvy” Judi Tompkins, Jo Franco and Susan Feller, five members of the TIGHR Australian Board were conferenced into the pictured group in Archbold, OH.  While the noise level made actual hearing and speaking on the US side almost impossible, the logistics emboldened many to become SKYPE -ees.  Plans are for a quieter place in the Sauder Heritage Inn next August. 
 
Conference calls to non-attendees of the Tri-Ennial in Stralthalbyn, Australia such as this will connect our worldwide membership with the events in October of 2012.  Visit www.tighr.net to learn more about The International Guild of Handhooking Rugmakers.  Join and visit Australia from the comfort of your own home.  Meet fiber artists from around the world talking about their version of rughooking.